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It is the mission of Scotland County Schools to develop responsible, productive citizens by providing excellent education for its children through engaging instruction. Partnering with families and the community, we will ensure every child’s academic, social, emotional and physical needs are met in a safe, nurturing environment.
 
What's Happening in Scotland County Schools
Chamber to host 'State of Education' breakfast on Friday

The Laurinburg/Scotland County Area Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring the 2nd annual 'State of Education' breakfast this Friday, September 19 at the Laurinburg Presbyterian Church. Breakfast will be served at 7:30 a.m. and the program will begin at 8:00 a.m. Featured speakers will be from Scotland County Schools, Richmond Community College, St. Andrews University, and the University of North Carolina - Pembroke. The registration fee is only $5.00. To register, or for more information, call the Chamber at 276-7420 or email kbuie@laurinburgchamber.com.
 

 
Scotland County Schools achieve gains in state accountability measures

When the 2013-14 data was released by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction on Thursday morning, Scotland County Schools had a lot to celebrate.  Most notably, the district made great gains by increasing the graduation rate 5.5 percentage points over last year to 78.3% for 2013-14 making this the highest graduation rate in Scotland County since 4-year cohort rates began being tracked by the state in 2006.  Also since 2006, Scotland County Schools graduation rate has improved with a cumulative overall increase in that time of 23.1 percentage points.  

Additionally, the rise in graduation rates has occurred alongside changes that have led to more challenging standards and assessments and increased graduation requirements.  Students today are required to earn more course credits – a minimum of 22 – than prior groups of students were required to earn. Students who entered high school before 2009 had to successfully complete at least 20 credits to qualify for graduation. In addition, students today are expected to complete mathematics through Math III, or the equivalent of Algebra II, as a minimum.

Requirements for high school graduation have been gradually increasing over the past 20 years. Today, graduates must earn at least 22 credits as follows: English (four credits); Mathematics (four credits, through Math III plus a fourth math); Science (three credits); Social Studies (four to include Civics and Economics, World History, American History I: Founding Principles and American History II or AP US History); Health and Physical Education (one credit); six electives (which can include world languages, Career and Technical Education, JROTC, arts or other courses).

Another area of significant improvement is our district’s Overall Performance Composite.  This score is an indicator of students’ performance on End-of-Grade and End-of-Course  tests.  In 2012-13, Scotland County Schools’ Performance Composite was 37.1% compared to 2013-14 where our district’s Performance Composite increased to 49.5%.  Furthermore, 13 out of 14 of our schools improved their overall performance composite in 2013-14 as well. 

Also, to better report students’ career and college readiness, the State Board of Education in March 2014 adopted a new five-level achievement scale that replaces the previous four-level scale. Students who score at Achievement Level 1 show limited command of the subject material. Achievement Level 2 students show partial command. Achievement Level 3 is considered the state proficiency standard and students at this level show sufficient command of subject material. Students who score at this level may get on track for career and college readiness with additional academic support. Achievement Levels 4 and 5 are considered career and college ready and students at these levels show solid command and superior command of subject material respectively. The 2013-14 school year is the first year that student proficiency is being reported under these five achievement levels.  For 2013-14, Scotland County Schools Career and College Readiness Proficiency is 38.6% (percentage of students that scored a Level 4 or 5 on their EOG or EOC tests). 

Annual Measureable Objective targets are also reported on in the NCDPI data.  AMO targets are established for every subject and every subgroup each year and performance and participation are measured.  Of the twelve AMO targets that we have in our district, Scotland County Schools out- performs the State in nine areas (Reading/Grades 3-8, Math/Grades 3-8, Science/Grades 3-8, Reading/Grade 10, Math/Grade 10, Science/Grade 11, Cohort Grade Rate, ACT WorkKeys, Math Course Rigor).  Scotland County Schools is equivalent to the State in the Current Year EOC and Attendance AMO targets.  The only AMO goal that we did not exceed or meet the State level was the ACT target, however our ACT proficiency increased from 40.8 in 2012-13 to 44.7 in 2013-14.

To see more information on how Scotland County Schools performed as well as to view additional State and comparison data, click here to view the NCDPI Accountability and Testing webpage.
 
Fabulous first days of school



By all accounts, the opening of the 2014-15 school year was one of the best yet!  Enjoy some scenes from schools around our district.  And for even more photos, click here to visit our district Facebook page.
 



 
SEarCH featured on regional news program



If you tuned in to WBTW, Channel 13's 11:00 pm newscast Thursday evening, you probably recognized some familiar faces.  The local station was on the campus of SEarCH Thursday morning to film for a story highlighting the partnership between Scotland County Schools, Richmond Community College, and St. Andrews University.  The reporter had the opportunity to speak with students as well as principal Joe Critcher, Superintendent Dr. Ron Hargrave, and St. Andrews President Paul Baldasare.  All were in agreement that the opportunities the Early College High School program offers students are many, but the chance to graduate with not only a high school diploma but a two-year degree as well is at the forefront. 

If you missed the original broadcast, click here to view the video with accompanying story and learn more about this unique partnership and the ways it is helping to prepare our students for college and careers. 
 

 
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